Appeal Bonds

At Surety Bonds Agent, we offer a full range of surety bonds nationwide through an extended carrier network. Learn more about appeal bonds below, and contact us today to request a quote. If you have additional questions or want to explore bonding solutions for your business, speak with one of our knowledgeable surety bond experts.

CONTACT US FOR A

FREE APPEAL BOND QUOTE

What Are Appeal Bonds?

People who lose a civil court case have the right to appeal the judgment against them. An appeal bond is a way to stop the execution of the judgment pending a court ruling on the appeal.

Consider the alternative. Without an appeal bond in place, the judgment could be executed before there is a decision on an appeal, only to find out after the fact that the court has ruled in favor of the appellant. Undoing something that has already been done is never easy.

An appeal bond that stays (delays) execution of a judgment until a higher court has ruled on the appeal is called a supersedeas bond. It is an appellant’s guarantee to satisfy the judgment imposed by the lower court if the appeal is lost and the judgment is upheld, which is the most likely scenario.

Most appeals ultimately fail because the only valid grounds for reversing a lower court’s decision is a procedural error during the original trial that compromised the rights of the defendant. The discovery of new evidence after the lower court has decided a case or challenges to testimony given during the original trial will not work.

Who Needs Them?

Because of the slim chance of winning an appeal, posting an appeal bond is typically a requirement for filing an appeal in any state. The bond not only ensures that the appellant will satisfy the judgment if the appeal is lost, but also helps discourage frivolous appeals intended only to delay the execution of a judgment.

Different states have different requirements regarding the amount of an appeal bond, but it’s usually somewhat more than the amount of the judgment. The extra margin covers court costs, any accrued interest on the judgment amount, and the winning party’s legal fees if ordered by the appellate court.

At Surety Bonds Agent, we offer a full range of surety bonds nationwide through an extended carrier network. Learn more about appeal bonds below, and contact us today to request a quote. If you have additional questions or want to explore bonding solutions for your business, speak with one of our knowledgeable surety bond experts.

CONTACT US FOR A

FREE APPEAL BOND QUOTE

What Are Appeal Bonds?

People who lose a civil court case have the right to appeal the judgment against them. An appeal bond is a way to stop the execution of the judgment pending a court ruling on the appeal.

Consider the alternative. Without an appeal bond in place, the judgment could be executed before there is a decision on an appeal, only to find out after the fact that the court has ruled in favor of the appellant. Undoing something that has already been done is never easy.

An appeal bond that stays (delays) execution of a judgment until a higher court has ruled on the appeal is called a supersedeas bond. It is an appellant’s guarantee to satisfy the judgment imposed by the lower court if the appeal is lost and the judgment is upheld, which is the most likely scenario.

Most appeals ultimately fail because the only valid grounds for reversing a lower court’s decision is a procedural error during the original trial that compromised the rights of the defendant. The discovery of new evidence after the lower court has decided a case or challenges to testimony given during the original trial will not work.

Who Needs Them?

Because of the slim chance of winning an appeal, posting an appeal bond is typically a requirement for filing an appeal in any state. The bond not only ensures that the appellant will satisfy the judgment if the appeal is lost, but also helps discourage frivolous appeals intended only to delay the execution of a judgment.

Different states have different requirements regarding the amount of an appeal bond, but it’s usually somewhat more than the amount of the judgment. The extra margin covers court costs, any accrued interest on the judgment amount, and the winning party’s legal fees if ordered by the appellate court.

How Do They Work?

The surety bond agreement underlying an appeal bond obligates the appellant (referred to as the bond’s “principal”) to pay the original judgment (or an amended judgment) if the appeal is denied. Depending on the judgment amount and the jurisdiction, full collateralization of an appeal bond may be required. If the higher court rules against the appellant, and the principal doesn’t satisfy the judgment within a specified length of time, the collateral will be used to pay it.

If an appeal bond is not fully collateralized, and the principal does not pay the original judgment promptly, the surety bond provider (referred to as the “surety”) will pay the judgment on behalf of the principal. The principal is then legally obligated to repay that debt to the surety.

What Do They Cost?

When an appeal bond is fully collateralized, the principal rarely pays a premium that’s more than about one percent of the required bond amount, because there is little risk to the surety.

If an appeal bond is not fully collateralized, the premium is based on the surety’s assessment of the principal’s creditworthiness as indicated by the principal’s credit score. With good credit, the premium rate should be in the range of one to three percent of the required bond amount.

REQUEST A QUOTE

Request a quote online or call today to speak with one of our surety bond experts about obtaining an appeal bond.