Supply Bonds

At Surety Bonds Agent, we offer a full range of surety bonds nationwide through an extended carrier network. Continue below to learn more about supply  bonds.  If you have additional questions or want to explore bonding solutions for your business, speak with one of our knowledgeable surety bond experts.

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What Are Supply Bonds?

Supply bonds are a type of surety bond known as contract bonds, which are commonly required for federally or state-funded public works projects in the construction industry. They help ensure that suppliers contracted–to provide certain materials for a construction project–are delivered as specified in the contract. Those contract specifications typically address price, quality, and delivery schedule. 

You can imagine what chaos could ensue if the wrong items are delivered or aren’t delivered on schedule, or at all! Construction could grind to a halt, which could impact the construction contractor’s ability to meet the project owner’s deadline or quality requirements. 

With a supply bond in place, if the supplier fails to live up to the terms of the supply contract, the construction contractor or project owner requiring the supply bond can file a claim against it and be compensated for any resulting financial loss.

Who Needs Them?

Supply bonds are commonly required for large public works construction projects. They are also a common requirement in other situations involving the purchase of supplies and materials using taxpayer dollars. For example, school systems that contract for the delivery of student meals or food supplies and government agencies that purchase paper and printer supplies or janitorial supplies in bulk may require supply bonds. In the private sector, manufacturers who enter into contracts with the suppliers of essential parts also may require those suppliers to purchase a supply bond.

How Do They Work?

The three parties to the surety bond agreement for a supply bond are known in the lingo of surety bonds as the “obligee” (the party requiring the bond), the “principal” (the supplier purchasing the bond), and the “surety” (the bond’s guarantor).  The agreement is legally binding on all three parties.

What Happens if a Claim is Filed?

If the principal violates the terms of the supply contract, causing the obligee to incur a financial loss, the obligee can file a claim for damages against the supply bond. The surety will investigate to make sure that the claim is valid and must be paid.

It’s the principal that is legally obligated to pay any claim deemed valid by the surety. But if the principal doesn’t pay a claim promptly the surety will pay it as the bond’s guarantor. That transforms the principal’s obligation to pay the claim into an obligation to repay the surety. If necessary, the surety can take legal action against the principal to recover the claim amount, plus court costs and legal fees.

What Do They Cost?

The annual premium for a supply bond is only a small percentage of the required bond amount established by the obligee. That percentage is the premium rate, which is determined on a case-by-case basis through the surety’s underwriting process. The main underwriting concern is the risk that the principal might not readily repay the surety for claims paid on the principal’s behalf. And the primary measure of that risk is the principal’s personal credit score. 

It’s reasonable to assume that a principal who has handled credit responsibly in the past will continue to do so, which suggests a low level or risk to the surety. That low risk earns the principal a low premium rate. Conversely, a low credit score suggests a high-risk level and warrants a high premium rate. So the premium rate for a given principal could be anywhere between 1% at the low end of the risk continuum to as much as 15% at the high end.

At Surety Bonds Agent, we offer a full range of surety bonds nationwide through an extended carrier network. Continue below to learn about Supply bonds and request an online quote. If you have additional questions or want to explore bonding solutions for your business, speak with one of our knowledgeable surety bond experts.

CONTACT US FOR A

FREE SUPPLY BOND QUOTE

What Are Supply Bonds?

Supply bonds are a type of surety bond known as contract bonds, which are commonly required for federally or state-funded public works projects in the construction industry. They help ensure that suppliers contracted–to provide certain materials for a construction project–are delivered as specified in the contract.

Supply bonds are commonly required for large public works construction projects. They are also a common requirement in other situations involving the purchase of supplies and materials using taxpayer dollars. For example, school systems that contract for the delivery of student meals or food supplies and government agencies that purchase paper and printer supplies or janitorial supplies in bulk may require supply bonds. In the private sector, manufacturers who enter into contracts with the suppliers of essential parts also may require those suppliers to purchase a supply bond.

The three parties to the surety bond agreement for a supply bond are known in the lingo of surety bonds as the “obligee” (the party requiring the bond), the “principal” (the supplier purchasing the bond), and the “surety” (the bond’s guarantor).  The agreement is legally binding on all three parties.

If the principal violates the terms of the supply contract, causing the obligee to incur a financial loss, the obligee can file a claim for damages against the supply bond. The surety will investigate to make sure that the claim is valid and must be paid.

It’s the principal that is legally obligated to pay any claim deemed valid by the surety. But if the principal doesn’t pay a claim promptly the surety will pay it as the bond’s guarantor. That transforms the principal’s obligation to pay the claim into an obligation to repay the surety. If necessary, the surety can take legal action against the principal to recover the claim amount, plus court costs and legal fees.

The annual premium for a supply bond is only a small percentage of the required bond amount established by the obligee. That percentage is the premium rate, which is determined on a case-by-case basis through the surety’s underwriting process. The main underwriting concern is the risk that the principal might not readily repay the surety for claims paid on the principal’s behalf. And the primary measure of that risk is the principal’s personal credit score. 

It’s reasonable to assume that a principal who has handled credit responsibly in the past will continue to do so, which suggests a low level or risk to the surety. That low risk earns the principal a low premium rate. Conversely, a low credit score suggests a high-risk level and warrants a high premium rate. So the premium rate for a given principal could be anywhere between 1% at the low end of the risk continuum to as much as 15% at the high end.

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Request a quote online or call today to speak with one of our surety bond agents about getting you a good rate on the Supply bond you need to do business in your state.