Janitorial Bonds

At Surety Bonds Agent, we offer janitorial bonds nationwide through an extended carrier network. To get started, simply request an online quote. If you have any questions or want to explore bonding solutions for your business, speak with one of our knowledgeable surety bond agents today.

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FREE JANITORIAL BOND QUOTE

What Are Janitorial Bonds?

Janitorial bonds are classified as business services bonds, which are a type of fidelity bond intended to provide financial protection for employers—specifically business owners who send employees out to clean a client’s home or work premises. The bond protects the business from being held liable for client losses caused by employee theft, fraud, or dishonesty.

Another major difference between fidelity bonds and traditional surety bonds is that despite their name, fidelity bonds function like an insurance policy. There are only two parties to a fidelity bond agreement: the business owner and the company underwriting and issuing the bond.

Who Needs Them?

No government agency in any state requires the purchase of janitorial bonds. The choice to purchase this type of bond is always voluntary, but there are several clear advantages to doing so.

Anyone who sends employees out to work in a client’s home or place of business runs the risk that a dishonest employee will steal or commit some other crime that results in a financial loss for the client. Potential clients also recognize that risk. Some clients—particularly large commercial clients such as banks and hotels—will not hire a janitorial company or cleaning service unless it is bonded to protect the client against illegal acts committed by its employees. Buying a janitorial bond is a small price to pay for gaining access to such clients.

Whether your business targets large commercial accounts or homeowners, having purchased a janitorial bond gives you a significant advantage in competing for new clients. Being bonded enhances your reputation and can be the key to growing your cleaning business.

How Do They Work?

Janitorial bonds, like other types of business services bonds, function more like insurance than like a surety bond. You get to decide how much coverage you want to purchase, what losses will be covered, and so on.

The bond protects your reputation and can prevent a client from suing you, but the primary protection is for your clients. A client who has incurred a loss due to a criminal act committed by one of your employees can file a claim against your bond and be compensated for that loss. Note that in some states, however, a claim can only be filed after the employee has been convicted of a crime.

It’s common for the surety bond company to pay claims upfront and then collect reimbursement from the bonded business owner. This gives you some time to gather the funds to cover the claim, but you are legally obligated to repay the surety company.

What Do They Cost?

The premium you’ll pay for a janitorial bond depends on such factors as the coverage amount you choose, how many employees will be covered, how large a deductible you opt for, and so on. In most cases, the premium should be about 2% of the total coverage amount. The easiest way to find out the exact cost for your business, however, is to simply request a quote.

At Surety Bonds Agent, we offer janitorial bonds nationwide through an extended carrier network. To get started, simply request an online quote. If you have any questions or want to explore bonding solutions for your business, speak with one of our knowledgeable surety bond agents today.

CONTACT US FOR A

FREE JANITORIAL BOND QUOTE

What Are Janitorial Bonds?

Janitorial bonds are classified as business services bonds, which are a type of fidelity bond intended to provide financial protection for employers—specifically business owners who send employees out to clean a client’s home or work premises. The bond protects the business from being held liable for client losses caused by employee theft, fraud, or dishonesty.

Another major difference between fidelity bonds and traditional surety bonds is that despite their name, fidelity bonds function like an insurance policy. There are only two parties to a fidelity bond agreement: the business owner and the company underwriting and issuing the bond.

No government agency in any state requires the purchase of janitorial bonds. The choice to purchase this type of bond is always voluntary, but there are several clear advantages to doing so.

Anyone who sends employees out to work in a client’s home or place of business runs the risk that a dishonest employee will steal or commit some other crime that results in a financial loss for the client. Potential clients also recognize that risk. Some clients—particularly large commercial clients such as banks and hotels—will not hire a janitorial company or cleaning service unless it is bonded to protect the client against illegal acts committed by its employees. Buying a janitorial bond is a small price to pay for gaining access to such clients.

Whether your business targets large commercial accounts or homeowners, having purchased a janitorial bond gives you a significant advantage in competing for new clients. Being bonded enhances your reputation and can be the key to growing your cleaning business.

Janitorial bonds, like other types of business services bonds, function more like insurance than like a surety bond. You get to decide how much coverage you want to purchase, what losses will be covered, and so on.

The bond protects your reputation and can prevent a client from suing you, but the primary protection is for your clients. A client who has incurred a loss due to a criminal act committed by one of your employees can file a claim against your bond and be compensated for that loss. Note that in some states, however, a claim can only be filed after the employee has been convicted of a crime.

It’s common for the surety bond company to pay claims upfront and then collect reimbursement from the bonded business owner. This gives you some time to gather the funds to cover the claim, but you are legally obligated to repay the surety company.

The premium you’ll pay for a janitorial bond depends on such factors as the coverage amount you choose, how many employees will be covered, how large a deductible you opt for, and so on. In most cases, the premium should be about 2% of the total coverage amount. The easiest way to find out the exact cost for your business, however, is to simply request a quote.

REQUEST A QUOTE

Request a quote online or call today to speak with one of our experienced professionals about your janitorial bond needs.