Vermont Contractor License Bonds

At Surety Bonds Agent, we offer a full range of surety bonds nationwide through an extended carrier network. Continue below to learn more about Vermont contractor license bonds. If you have additional questions or want to explore bonding solutions for your business, speak with one of our knowledgeable surety bond experts.

 

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What Is a Contractor License Bond?

A Vermont contractor license bond is not always a requirement for operating as a general contractor in Vermont, as general contractors are not licensed at the state level. However, electricians and plumbers are.

The purpose of a contractor license bond, in the instances where one is required, is to provide financial protection for project owners. Specifically, a contractor license bond protects project owners against monetary losses caused by the contractor’s unlawful or unethical actions.

Who Needs One?

Although Vermont does not license general contractors at the state level, some counties and municipalities have local licenses or permit requirements. In jurisdictions where there is a license or permit requirement, the terms of the surety bond agreement obligate a contractor to comply with local regulations and building codes. Be sure to find out what license and bonding requirements may exist in any jurisdiction where you plan to work as a general contractor.

How Does a Contractor License Bond Work?

Every Vermont contractor license bond is a legally binding contract among three parties: the local jurisdiction (the “obligee”) requiring the bond, the contractor (the “principal”) purchasing it, and the bond’s guarantor (the “surety”).

Any violation by the principal that causes financial harm to a project owner gives the injured party the right to file a claim for compensation. The surety has the power to determine whether a claim is valid. The legal obligation to pay valid claims belongs to the principal and only the principal. The surety is indemnified against any liability for damages.

However, in guaranteeing the bond, the surety has agreed to extend credit to the principal for the purpose of paying a valid claim if that becomes necessary. In such cases, the surety will pay the claimant directly, which creates a debt that the principal must then repay to the surety within a certain length of time. Failure to repay the debt can result in the surety suing the principal to recover the funds, plus court costs and legal fees.

How Much Does It Cost?

Vermont contractor license bonds are sold for a premium calculated by multiplying the required bond amount (which varies by jurisdiction) by the premium rate the surety establishes through underwriting. The primary underwriting consideration is the risk the surety will be taking on in agreeing to extend credit to the principal. The underwriters measure that risk using the principal’s personal credit score.

The main underwriting concern is the risk of the surety not being repaid for claims paid on behalf of the principal. The risk of non-repayment is assessed largely on the basis of the principal’s personal credit score.

A high credit score is interpreted as a sign of low risk, which deserves a low premium rate, as low as 1% or even less. A low credit score suggests a higher risk level, which warrants a higher premium rate.

At Surety Bonds Agent, we offer a full range of surety bonds nationwide through an extended carrier network. Continue below to learn more about Vermont contractor license bonds. If you have additional questions or want to explore bonding solutions for your business, speak with one of our knowledgeable surety bond experts.

 

CONTACT US FOR A

FREE CONSTRUCTION BOND QUOTE

What Is a Contractor License Bond?

A Vermont contractor license bond is not always a requirement for operating as a general contractor in Vermont, as general contractors are not licensed at the state level. However, electricians and plumbers are.

The purpose of a contractor license bond, in the instances where one is required, is to provide financial protection for project owners. Specifically, a contractor license bond protects project owners against monetary losses caused by the contractor’s unlawful or unethical actions.

Although Vermont does not license general contractors at the state level, some counties and municipalities have local licenses or permit requirements. In jurisdictions where there is a license or permit requirement, the terms of the surety bond agreement obligate a contractor to comply with local regulations and building codes. Be sure to find out what license and bonding requirements may exist in any jurisdiction where you plan to work as a general contractor.

Every Vermont contractor license bond is a legally binding contract among three parties: the local jurisdiction (the “obligee”) requiring the bond, the contractor (the “principal”) purchasing it, and the bond’s guarantor (the “surety”).

Any violation by the principal that causes financial harm to a project owner gives the injured party the right to file a claim for compensation. The surety has the power to determine whether a claim is valid. The legal obligation to pay valid claims belongs to the principal and only the principal. The surety is indemnified against any liability for damages.

However, in guaranteeing the bond, the surety has agreed to extend credit to the principal for the purpose of paying a valid claim if that becomes necessary. In such cases, the surety will pay the claimant directly, which creates a debt that the principal must then repay to the surety within a certain length of time. Failure to repay the debt can result in the surety suing the principal to recover the funds, plus court costs and legal fees.

Vermont contractor license bonds are sold for a premium calculated by multiplying the required bond amount (which varies by jurisdiction) by the premium rate the surety establishes through underwriting. The primary underwriting consideration is the risk the surety will be taking on in agreeing to extend credit to the principal. The underwriters measure that risk using the principal’s personal credit score.

The main underwriting concern is the risk of the surety not being repaid for claims paid on behalf of the principal. The risk of non-repayment is assessed largely on the basis of the principal’s personal credit score.

A high credit score is interpreted as a sign of low risk, which deserves a low premium rate, as low as 1% or even less. A low credit score suggests a higher risk level, which warrants a higher premium rate.

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